Catégorie : Articles

HIV and mental health: The elephant in the room

By Tammy C. Yates

In his famous poem “The Blind Men and the Elephant”, John Godfrey Saxe retells an Indian parable about three blind men who went to see an elephant. Of course, being blind, they could only ‘see’ the elephant by touching it. When asked to describe the elephant, one grabbed it by its trunk and said, “An elephant is like a snake!” The second man took his turn to touch it, pulled it by the leg, and confidently determined, “No, an elephant is like a tree trunk!” The third and final person to touch the elephant grabbed it by its tusks and said, “Tsk, tsk, tsk, you are both wrong: an elephant is smooth, cold and hard.” Each of the men touched the elephant, yet from their perspectives, the experiences of the elephant were totally different.

Connected patients, connected providers: Delivering comprehensive, coordinated, team-based care to people living with HIV in Canada

By Dr. Claire Kendall and Katie Ablett

Thanks to effective anti-HIV treatment, HIV has evolved into a chronic illness. However, people living with HIV often today also live with other physical and mental health conditions, which can be difficult to cope with, especially for those also coping with difficult socio-economic circumstances.

To provide quality care to people living with HIV and other long-term medical and social conditions, health-care providers not only need to ensure  that people living with HIV are engaged in quality health care, but we also need to enhance the capacity of Canadian HIV clinics to integrate and coordinate additional resources. By integrating and coordinating resources, we help address the needs of a whole person —needs that often cut across the various disciplines, specialties, sectors and systems that we have traditionally organized care around.

The good news is that through several interconnected research studies, our research team led out of the Bruyère Research Institute in Ottawa has shown that the complex health and social care needs of people living with HIV can be met –and, in fact, are being met –by various care models, settings and teams working in HIV clinics across Canada.

Arrivons-nous à la fin du développement de médicaments contre le VHC?

par Sean Hosein

Au cours des sept dernières années, nous avons assisté à une mise au point étourdissante de médicaments contre le virus de l’hépatite C (VHC). Chaque nouveau traitement s’est généralement révélé plus efficace que le précédent. Les plus récents traitements approuvés pour le VHC au Canada cette semaine incluent Maviret (fabriquée par AbbVie) et Vosevi (fabriqué par Gilead). Lors des essais cliniques, ces traitements offerts sous forme de comprimé ont donné lieu à des taux élevés de guérison (habituellement supérieurs à 95 pour cent) et ont causé peu d’effets secondaires graves. Même s’il s’écoulera encore six mois ou plus avant que ces traitements se trouvent sur les listes de médicaments assurés provinciales, territoriales et autres, leur approbation signale que la fin du développement des médicaments contre le VHC est à l’horizon.

World Hepatitis Day: Finally something to celebrate?

By Annika Ollner

Every year on July 28, we mark World Hepatitis Day with an event to educate, gather together, and also remember those we have lost from the hepatitis C community. This year, we should have much to celebrate: in early 2017, medications that had previously been unavailable were finally added to some formularies, including Ontario’s. This  means that people with certain types of hepatitis C who have been waiting years to access safe, effective medication will finally be able to start treatment and be cured. For many, being cured means avoiding potentially fatal outcomes like liver failure and liver cancer. It also means shedding the burden of carrying a highly stigmatized illness that is often met with ignorance, ostracism and discrimination.

Hepatitis C cascade of care: An essential tool for monitoring progress towards HCV elimination

By Dr. Naveed Z Janjua

The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health problem. Worldwide, about 70 million people are living with hepatitis C virus infection, with a higher prevalence in developing countries. In Canada, 210,753 to 461,517 people are infected with HCV, and an estimated 20 to 40 per cent of infections remain undiagnosed. Those born during the period of 1945 until 1965 have the highest rates of infection and, having acquired the virus decades ago, are now increasingly being diagnosed with serious liver-related illnesses, including liver failure and liver cancer and non-liver related illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and kidney disease.