Catégorie : Opinions

La Déclaration de consensus canadien. Appuyez-la. Utilisez-la. C’est ce que j’ai fait et voici pourquoi.

Glenn BetteridgePar Glenn Betteridge

Plusieurs d’entre vous ont possiblement observé les fluctuations qui se produisent dans le mouvement communautaire, au gré des percées médicales et scientifiques, des priorités, du militantisme communautaire ainsi que des forces plus globales d’ordre politique, social et économique. Depuis plus de vingt ans que je travaille dans le milieu communautaire et y fais du bénévolat, je cherche à m’ancrer dans quelques fondements bien solides, pour donner une base stable à mon travail. Le lien essentiel entre la santé et les droits humains. La nécessité de fonder les politiques, programmes et services sur les données probantes et l’expérience vécue. De même que l’engagement à la justice sociale et une attention sérieuse aux voix des personnes les plus touchées. C’est pourquoi j’ai signé et appuyé la Déclaration de consensus canadien sur les bienfaits de santé et de prévention associés au dépistage du VIH et aux médicaments antirétroviraux contre le VIH. La Déclaration de consensus mise sur ces mêmes fondements afin de jeter les bases d’une réponse à l’épidémie du VIH qui soit exhaustive, holistique et dirigée par la communauté alliant le traitement et la prévention du VIH ainsi que la santé et les droits de la personne.

Indigenous Youth Leaders are Taking Action on HIV in their Communities!

By Sarah Flicker and the Native Youth Sexual Health Network

Group shot

Taking Action II is a community-based action research project about building and supporting Indigenous youth leadership in the HIV/AIDS movement.  We are a group of Indigenous youth leaders, Indigenous community-based organizations and university-based researchers. We wanted to create awareness around HIV, sexual health, and decolonization in First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities across Turtle Island (also known as Canada).

In Taking Action I, we worked with over 100 youth in six Indigenous communities across Canada to make art about the links between HIV and colonization. We did this as a way of broadening the conversations about HIV – to move away from the individual shame-and-blame discourse. We wanted to help communities understand and respond back to all the structural factors that have conspired to make them vulnerable to HIV: racism, poverty, land theft, residential schools, loss of language/culture, epidemics of addiction, the Sixties Scoop (the practice of taking Indigenous children and placing them in foster homes beginning in the 1960s) and ongoing child welfare involvement, incarceration, etc. Youth created a lot of amazing art that took up these themes. They loved our workshops and asked for more opportunities to get together with youth from other communities.

HPV Vaccine: Who needs it?

By Dr. Irving Salit

Irv PortraitDid you know that men can get HPV cancers? HPV (the human papillomavirus) causes warts, pre-cancers and cancers. HPV is most famous for causing cervical cancer so it has mainly been linked in people’s minds to cancer in women. Because of that, HPV cancer prevention programs have only focused on women (for example, governments spend many millions on cervical cancer screening and immunizing girls against HPV). However, HPV is readily passed between partners and the other half of the world (men!) get HPV as much as women do. So let us get the facts straight about HPV in men and women and what to do about it.

HIV disclosure is more than a one-time conversation

By Erin Seatter

Erin Setter Decades after the emergence of HIV, disclosure remains one of the biggest challenges for women living with HIV. There’s nothing easy or straightforward about it. When thinking about whether to tell someone about their HIV-positive status, women must consider a range of possible results, for themselves as well as their families.

Some women find that disclosure can help bring peace of mind, with more freedom from fear and stress. Being able to talk honestly about their health and get day-to-day support can be a relief. Very close relationships involve sharing, vulnerability and listening, and sometimes women find that disclosure leads to more open discussions, tighter connections and stronger intimacy.

Six ways to make harm reduction work in Canada’s prisons

By Emily van der Meulen and Sandra Ka Hon Chuemily

sandraIn Canada today, prisoners who inject drugs need to share needles, many of which have been used numerous times by other prisoners. Without access to sterile injection equipment, rates of HIV and hepatitis C virus are much higher behind bars than in the broader community. Prison-based needle and syringe programs (PNSPs) are an important way to address this public health problem, yet Canadian correctional authorities often claim they won’t work. A recent study demonstrates that PNSPs are indisputably feasible in Canada and should be implemented now.

A new report, On Point: Recommendations for Prison-Based Needle and Syringe Programs in Canada, outlines the findings of a two-year study that involved consultation with a range of diverse stakeholders, including former prisoners themselves. The research was conducted by representatives from the Department of Criminology at Ryerson University, PASAN (a community-based AIDS service organization that provides community development, education, and support to prisoners and ex-prisoners in Ontario), and the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network (one of the world’s leading organizations tackling the legal and human rights issues related to HIV).