Tag: La criminalisation

We need to address the unique and complex issues of Indigenous people living with HIV

Indigenous people in Canada are disproportionately affected by HIV, representing 10.8 per cent of new HIV infections and 9.1 per cent of people living with HIV in Canada.[1]  In Saskatchewan alone, the number of Indigenous people living with HIV is around twice the national average and the highest in Canada and “one of the few places in the industrialized world where people are still dying from AIDS and HIV.” Lack of access to HIV treatment and care among other complex factors contributes to these alarming rates: in many rural or remote areas, HIV-specific services are simply not available, or the small...

Pour en savoir plus...

Nouveau gouvernement, nouvelles priorités : répondre aux besoins de tous les Canadiens

La campagne électorale a été longue et pleine de rebondissements, et les Canadiens attendent maintenant de voir ce que fera notre nouveau gouvernement. Pendant la campagne, Action Canada pour la santé et les droits sexuels a publié une série de fiches thématiques sur ce que devrait faire le gouvernement sur divers enjeux liés aux droits sexuels et reproductifs. Certains gestes ont déjà été posés, mais le gros du travail proposé dans ces fiches reste à faire pour que notre pays respecte enfin ses obligations face à ces droits sexuels et reproductifs.

Pour en savoir plus...

A clinician’s perspective on the criminalization of women living with HIV

In Canada and in much of the Western world, thanks to the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a clear improvement in health status and increased life expectancy of people living with HIV approaching that of the general population. However, despite these medical advances, negative public perception about HIV has yet to catch up to the reality that most clinicians encounter. The reality for the most part is of healthy and conscientious patients looking to improve their quality of life.

Pour en savoir plus...