Tag: COVID19

Indigenous responses to COVID-19 and hepatitis: A conference report back

Viral hepatitis impacts Indigenous peoples around the world at much higher than average rates, harming their physical, spiritual, emotional, social and economic health. This is the result of historic and ongoing colonialism, and includes significantly worse health determinants, inadequate access to immunization and treatment, and inadequacies in the provision of culturally safe and responsive healthcare to Indigenous people. COVID-19 has further impacted Indigenous peoples, but many communities and healthcare practitioners are finding innovative ways of responding to the pandemic, while simultaneously trying to continue providing hepatitis care. Many of these responses were shared in a virtual mini-conference hosted by the...

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What topics in the CATIE Blog were top of mind in 2020?

The year 2020 will leave an indelible mark on our collective consciousness: across the world, people are confronted with the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and it seems to have consumed our lives. For many of us, not a day goes by that we don’t think about the virus, how it has altered our daily activities and what we need to do for our communities to remain healthy. Since the virus hit Canada in March 2020, service providers from across the country have mobilized to keep their clients safe and provide them the care and services they need to prevent, test...

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Transitioning from incarceration to the community: Reducing risks and improving lives of people who use substances

To help incarcerated people who use substances successfully integrate back into their communities, Direction 180 started the Peers Assisting and Lending Support (PALS) program in January 2019 through harm reduction funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada.  Direction 180 is a community-based organization that offers an opioid treatment program in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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Satellite Sites: Providing harm reduction from the homes of people who use drugs

The term “satellite sites” is used to refer to informal harm reduction hubs operating out of the homes of people who use drugs. Operating in Toronto for more than 20 years, these sites offer access to sterile drug use supplies outside of more formal settings like health centres. Although many satellite sites offer much more than this – including naloxone and overdose response training, needle disposal and referrals to healthcare services. Satellite programs emerged from the recognition that people who use drugs were already doing this work within their communities, operating informally to meet harm reduction needs and respond to a range of other health needs.

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