Author: CATIE

Reaching the first 90: how HIV self-testing can help us end the HIV epidemic

Canada has signed on to the global 90-90-90 targets to end the HIV epidemic by 2030. The aim of these targets is to diagnose at least 90% of all people living with HIV, provide treatment for 90% of those diagnosed, and for 90% of people on treatment to have an undetectable viral load by 2020. However, Canada is falling short on the first 90, lagging behind other similar countries, such as the United Kingdom and Australia. An estimated 86% of Canadians living with HIV have been diagnosed. That means that the other 14%, or over 9,000 Canadians, are living with HIV...

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Can’t Pass It On: Rainer and Eka’s story

CATIE recently launched its Can’t Pass It On campaign to increase awareness that people living with HIV on effective treatment can’t pass it on to a partner. The series features real serodifferent couples with one HIV-positive and one HIV-negative partner. CATIE sat down with one of these couples, Rainer Oktovianus and Eka Nasution, to learn more about their story and why they chose to participate in the campaign. 

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An “HIV status neutral” paradigm shift

HIV is not what it used to be. Many people with HIV describe it as a chronic condition and a manageable part of their life. HIV prevention is not what it used to be, either. The simultaneous rise of “undetectable equals untransmittable” (U=U) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) caused a radical change in the way we talk about HIV transmission and prevention: We now have more tools than ever to prevent HIV. We now confidently say that people living with HIV on effective treatment can’t pass it on to a sexual partner. Sometimes a major change is needed to spark new ideas...

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Meeting people where they are is about much more than location: Delivering hepatitis C care and treatment to people who use drugs

Poverty, stigma and criminalization are chronic problems among people who use and inject drugs. But hepatitis C virus (HCV) is no longer such a problem, since it is usually cured by eight to 12 weeks of oral, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). Delivering DAAs to people who use and inject drugs in the context of the chronic problems facing them is an opportunity to recognize and support the contribution of people with lived experience, and to build and strengthen systems and programs. These systems and programs must provide welcoming, respectful and safe spaces for people who use and inject drugs, as they...

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Community pharmacists: Underutilized resources in the HIV care team

Pharmacists are drug therapy experts. We are responsible for ensuring medications are used safely, responsibly and effectively to maximize the benefits of treatment. This is especially true in the provision of care to people living with HIV. But community pharmacists are often seen as separate from the HIV care team. We are largely left out of therapeutic decision-making, despite our central role in dispensing medications. But community pharmacists have demonstrated that we can play a vital role in HIV care.

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