Tag: HIV prevention

Can Halifax open Atlantic Canada’s first legal overdose prevention site? Yes, we can!

This blog post is a follow-up from an earlier post published on July 11, 2019. As I work on a new funding proposal, this statement strikes me: over 11,500 people in Canada have lost their lives as a result of opioid-related overdoses between January 2016 and December 2018 and we keep losing people every day. So many lives lost! And why is that? The evidence is clear that overdose prevention sites save lives! After I returned from a hands-on training in the Downtown East Side of Vancouver, one of the hardest hit places in the overdose crisis, it became even...

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Gay men, substance use and harm reduction: it’s time to act

Harm reduction and gay men’s HIV prevention could be considered two historic elements in our HIV response that have long stood separate from one another. Traditionally, HIV prevention with gay men focused on sexual risk, while harm reduction focused on risks associated with injection drug use. Both approaches have evolved over the decades and some might argue that safer sex is a form of harm reduction, but in the context of drug use, there has been little focus given to harm reduction in the context of gay men’s sexual health.

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Comment la PrEP et la charge virale indétectable redéfinissent-elles les relations sociales des hommes gais et bisexuels?

Indétectable = Intransmissible, PrEP, Traitement comme prévention… Si ces approches font aujourd’hui consensus parmi les experts communautaires et scientifiques du VIH, leur appropriation par un plus large public reste encore incertaine. Dans la communauté gaie, ce nouveau contexte de la prévention suscite encore des résistances ou des questionnements : il suffit d’engager la conversation sur le sujet, en ligne ou dans un bar, pour s’en apercevoir!

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Ending the epidemic for whom?

Ending the HIV epidemic in Canada in five years seems like an ambitious goal, but it is now in fact a target being advocated by a group of public health and HIV advocates in a new document published by the Canadian Foundation for AIDS Research (CANFAR). I am one of the authors of that document, which acknowledges the necessity of addressing racism and structural violence. But, except for support from a couple co-authors, I am dispirited by the co-authors’ failure to be clear about the difference those systemic and structural issues make, to inspire determination in addressing them, and to...

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