Category: News

National survey reveals information habits of people living with HIV

By David McLay

ValuedAndNeededInfo.2015.en-mwFrom its beginning, CATIE has shared information with people living with HIV so that they can take better care of their health. In Fall 2015, we undertook a national online survey to better understand the information needs of people living with HIV today. The survey results may confirm what you already know about your clients’ information needs. Or perhaps they contain a surprise or two. Whatever the case, the results help guide all of us in how we can best serve our clients.

How The Cedar Project is using mobile phones to engage young Indigenous people who use drugs in HIV prevention and treatment

By Kate Jongbloed

Members of the Cedar Project Partnership in March 2015.

Members of the Cedar Project Partnership in March 2015.

 

How’s it going?

These three little words have tremendous power. Sent as a simple text message, it creates an opportunity for dialogue between a case manager and a person seeking health care.

It is the power of those three words that drives a new mobile phone program in B.C. that connects young Indigenous people living with or vulnerable to HIV with much-needed care and services.

Trois points à retenir de la Conférence AFRAVIH 2016

Par Gabriel Girard

Gabriel-Girard-690x447L’AFRAVIH est une conférence scientifique, organisée tous les deux ans par l’Alliance francophone des acteurs de santé contre le VIH. Elle avait lieu cette année du 20 au 23 avril à Bruxelles, rassemblant plus d’un millier de participants, venus d’Europe, d’Afrique, d’Asie ou d’Amérique du Nord. L’AFRAVIH ouvre un espace de débat francophone unique pour les acteurs de la lutte contre le VIH et les hépatites virales. La conférence est l’occasion de discuter avec des intervenants très divers, issus du milieu communautaire, de la recherche ou de la santé publique. Difficile de faire le tri dans un programme aussi riche[1]… Mais voici trois points à retenir de la conférence!

Health Canada’s statement on the status of naloxone is a welcome drug policy paradigm shift

By Dr. Lynne LeonardLynne Leonard pic

The administration of naloxone, a chemical compound that effectively temporarily reverses the effects of an opioid overdose, is recommended by the World Health Organization to be used in the case of an opioid overdose. Naloxone is currently available in Canada only in an injectable form and by prescription only; it can only be administered to the person named on the prescription, not to a third party. With the objective of making naloxone more widely available in Canada to address the growing number of opioid overdoses, and consequent on a review of health and safety data, Health Canada has suggested an amendment to the prescription drug list to allow non-prescription use of naloxone specifically for emergency use for opioid overdose outside hospital settings. A public consultation on the proposal has been initiated and if the change in status continues to be supported by consultation evidence, the change will be finalized.

Queer women are ignored in HIV research: this is a problem and here is why it matters

By Carmen Logiecarmen logie

Lesbian, bisexual and queer women are rarely included in HIV research. Women who have sex with women, and their HIV infection rates, are not captured anywhere because women cannot report having a woman as a sexual partner in Canada’s HIV statistics. The current record only allows women to report HIV exposure either through injection drug use or heterosexual sex. This contributes to the erasure of women’s sexual and gender diversity and fluidity in HIV research. Queer* women are ignored in HIV research: this is a problem and here is why it matters.