Category: Articles

Inclusion and respect – appreciating the role people living with HIV have with our research partners

A volunteer from the Victorian AIDS Council at a community march.

By Brent Allan, Laurel Sprague, Suzy Malhotra and Rebecca Matheson

The partnerships forged between people living with HIV and researchers have been an essential foundation upon which the response to the HIV epidemic has grown. And the time has come to reaffirm and recommit to principles of inclusion and respect in the conduct of presenting research findings that impacts on our lives.

A step toward ending unjust HIV criminalization, with more to be done in 2018

by Nicholas Caivano

For people living with HIV and their allies, 2017 was a ground-breaking year. It culminated with both the federal and Ontario governments publicly recognizing the need to limit the over-criminalization of HIV in Canada. On World AIDS Day 2017, both acknowledged that criminal prosecution for alleged HIV non-disclosure is not warranted when a person living with HIV has a “suppressed viral load” (i.e., less than 200 copies of HIV/ml of blood) because such an individual poses no “realistic possibility” of transmitting the virus—the Supreme Court’s legal test for whether a duty to disclose exists.

Eliminating viral hepatitis is possible: Four lessons from the World Hepatitis Summit

By Melisa Dickie

As deaths from many communicable diseases continue to decline globally, deaths caused by viral hepatitis have now surpassed all other chronic infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Yet it is one of the few global health threats with easy solutions. Highly effective vaccines exist for hepatitis A and B. We now have a cure for hepatitis C. With these tools at our disposal, why aren’t we seeing an impact on the epidemic?

Le crystal meth, parlons-en

par Martin Bilodeau

Si la dépendance psychologique au crystal est puissante, son association intime avec le cul, dans la communauté gaie, doit être nommée, reconnue et abordée, puisque tout simplement, l’un peut être le revers qui fait rechuter l’autre.

Si une substance peut devenir problématique en soi, il demeure impératif de prendre en compte les facteurs intersectionnels en jeu dans la relation à sa consommation.

De même, le facteur technologique des modes de rencontre et de livraison de baise et de drogue à domicile doit être pris en considération dans notre compréhension du sujet et ce, sans stigmatisation.

HIV and mental health: The elephant in the room

By Tammy C. Yates

In his famous poem “The Blind Men and the Elephant”, John Godfrey Saxe retells an Indian parable about three blind men who went to see an elephant. Of course, being blind, they could only ‘see’ the elephant by touching it. When asked to describe the elephant, one grabbed it by its trunk and said, “An elephant is like a snake!” The second man took his turn to touch it, pulled it by the leg, and confidently determined, “No, an elephant is like a tree trunk!” The third and final person to touch the elephant grabbed it by its tusks and said, “Tsk, tsk, tsk, you are both wrong: an elephant is smooth, cold and hard.” Each of the men touched the elephant, yet from their perspectives, the experiences of the elephant were totally different.