Mot clé : Prévention du VIH

PositiveLite.com: It’s gone, so what next?

by Bob Leahy

The PositiveLite.com team (from left to right): Rob Olver, Wayne Bristow, John McCullagh and Bob Leahy

It’s not  surprising that PositiveLite.com —what we called Canada’s online HIV magazine but it was, I’d argue, so much more —came to an end on March 31. It had been going for nine years.

It was a unique model run by people living with HV for people living with HIV. Most people thought we had big offices; in fact, we operated out of our own homes. We were independent in all senses of the word.

Tirer des leçons de la situation d’urgence créée par le VIH en Saskatchewan

Par Susanne Nicolay

Depuis 2009, la Saskatchewan figure en tête des provinces canadiennes ayant le taux le plus élevé de nouvelles infections au VIH et la plus importante proportion de personnes vivant avec le VIH. L’épidémie de VIH dans cette province est unique par rapport aux autres juridictions du Canada, car plus des trois quarts de nos nouvelles infections surviennent chez les personnes qui utilisent des drogues injectables (la moyenne canadienne se situe sous la barre des 14 %).

Love Positive Women: why a fulfilling sexual life with HIV matters

By Allison Carter, Jessica Whitbread and Angela Kaida

« I went through a long period, seems like ancient history now, but I remember when I was first diagnosed, I felt so dirty. Like everything about me was, I suppose, unsafe and unclean and my blood was just full of crap. Just the whole thing was very internalized… For the most part now, I feel loveable. I feel good about myself. I just feel like I’ve still got a lot to offer and give and that I can be part of a strong, healthy relationship, despite the difficulties, I suppose. »
Anonymous quote by a woman living with HIV

A step toward ending unjust HIV criminalization, with more to be done in 2018

by Nicholas Caivano

For people living with HIV and their allies, 2017 was a ground-breaking year. It culminated with both the federal and Ontario governments publicly recognizing the need to limit the over-criminalization of HIV in Canada. On World AIDS Day 2017, both acknowledged that criminal prosecution for alleged HIV non-disclosure is not warranted when a person living with HIV has a “suppressed viral load” (i.e., less than 200 copies of HIV/ml of blood) because such an individual poses no “realistic possibility” of transmitting the virus—the Supreme Court’s legal test for whether a duty to disclose exists.