Lessons learned from the HCV Symposium Part 1: Blinders off, and who cleans up after the fight?

By Leona Quewezance and Stephanie Massey

On February 27, 2016 CATIE had the opportunity to host another Learning Institute (LI) at the 5th Canadian Symposium on HCV in Montreal, Quebec. Learning Institutes are exciting knowledge-exchange and capacity-building opportunities for stakeholders engaged in Hep C prevention, treatment and care across Canada. Our 15 rapporteurs learned about current research and worked together to summarize that information and bring it back to their communities.

In part one of this two-part blog series, two rapporteurs reflect on their experiences at the LI.

HPV Vaccine: Who needs it?

By Dr. Irving Salit

Irv PortraitDid you know that men can get HPV cancers? HPV (the human papillomavirus) causes warts, pre-cancers and cancers. HPV is most famous for causing cervical cancer so it has mainly been linked in people’s minds to cancer in women. Because of that, HPV cancer prevention programs have only focused on women (for example, governments spend many millions on cervical cancer screening and immunizing girls against HPV). However, HPV is readily passed between partners and the other half of the world (men!) get HPV as much as women do. So let us get the facts straight about HPV in men and women and what to do about it.

How The Cedar Project is using mobile phones to engage young Indigenous people who use drugs in HIV prevention and treatment

By Kate Jongbloed

Members of the Cedar Project Partnership in March 2015.

Members of the Cedar Project Partnership in March 2015.

 

How’s it going?

These three little words have tremendous power. Sent as a simple text message, it creates an opportunity for dialogue between a case manager and a person seeking health care.

It is the power of those three words that drives a new mobile phone program in B.C. that connects young Indigenous people living with or vulnerable to HIV with much-needed care and services.

HIV disclosure is more than a one-time conversation

By Erin Seatter

Erin Setter Decades after the emergence of HIV, disclosure remains one of the biggest challenges for women living with HIV. There’s nothing easy or straightforward about it. When thinking about whether to tell someone about their HIV-positive status, women must consider a range of possible results, for themselves as well as their families.

Some women find that disclosure can help bring peace of mind, with more freedom from fear and stress. Being able to talk honestly about their health and get day-to-day support can be a relief. Very close relationships involve sharing, vulnerability and listening, and sometimes women find that disclosure leads to more open discussions, tighter connections and stronger intimacy.

Trois points à retenir de la Conférence AFRAVIH 2016

Par Gabriel Girard

Gabriel-Girard-690x447L’AFRAVIH est une conférence scientifique, organisée tous les deux ans par l’Alliance francophone des acteurs de santé contre le VIH. Elle avait lieu cette année du 20 au 23 avril à Bruxelles, rassemblant plus d’un millier de participants, venus d’Europe, d’Afrique, d’Asie ou d’Amérique du Nord. L’AFRAVIH ouvre un espace de débat francophone unique pour les acteurs de la lutte contre le VIH et les hépatites virales. La conférence est l’occasion de discuter avec des intervenants très divers, issus du milieu communautaire, de la recherche ou de la santé publique. Difficile de faire le tri dans un programme aussi riche[1]… Mais voici trois points à retenir de la conférence!