How intimate partner violence affects women living with HIV

By Sandra Ka Hon Chu

SANDRA_HI_RES- croppedA global study released last year revealed alarming figures concerning women living with HIV and violence. Among 945 women living with HIV from 94 countries who participated in the study, 89 per cent reported having experienced or feared violence before, since and/or because of their HIV diagnosis. Violence they experienced was reported to be higher after HIV diagnosis from their intimate partner and others in their social network. [1]The troubling nexus between HIV and gender-based violence spurred the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, HIV & AIDS Legal Clinic Ontario and METRAC to produce a legal information guide for women living with HIV who are facing — or at risk of — “intimate partner violence” — that is, physical, sexual or psychological harm from a current or former partner or spouse.

In addition to being an exceedingly common experience among women living with HIV, intimate partner violence and HIV are both stigmatized, isolating people who are affected. Intimate partner violence also increases women’s vulnerability to HIV. Women who have violent partners are more likely to have forced sex, are less likely to negotiate condom use, and are more likely to be abused when they insist on condom use— which poses greater risks of HIV transmission.

The SABSA clinic shows its resilience and wins its fight to stay open!

By Liam Michaud

SABSAAfter a long battle, the SABSA solidarity co-operative clinic – an acronym which translates roughly to service at a low-threshold of accessibility – succeeded in negotiating a service agreement with the Québec Ministry of Health on July 20th, to continue to offer its services to members of the Saint-Roch and Saint-Sauveur communities in Québec City.

National survey reveals information habits of people living with HIV

By David McLay

ValuedAndNeededInfo.2015.en-mwFrom its beginning, CATIE has shared information with people living with HIV so that they can take better care of their health. In Fall 2015, we undertook a national online survey to better understand the information needs of people living with HIV today. The survey results may confirm what you already know about your clients’ information needs. Or perhaps they contain a surprise or two. Whatever the case, the results help guide all of us in how we can best serve our clients.

Lessons learned from the HCV Symposium Part 2: Equal access, equal representation

By Sarah Cloutier and Yung-Wo Jao

On February 27, 2016 CATIE had the opportunity to host another Learning Institute (LI) at the 5th Canadian Symposium on HCV in Montreal, Quebec.  Learning Institutes are exciting knowledge-exchange and capacity-building opportunities for stakeholders engaged in Hep C prevention, treatment and care across Canada. Our 15 rapporteurs learned about current research and worked together to summarize that information and bring it back to their communities. 

 In part two of this two-part blog series, two rapporteurs reflect on their experiences at the LI.

Lessons learned from the HCV Symposium Part 1: Blinders off, and who cleans up after the fight?

By Leona Quewezance and Stephanie Massey

On February 27, 2016 CATIE had the opportunity to host another Learning Institute (LI) at the 5th Canadian Symposium on HCV in Montreal, Quebec. Learning Institutes are exciting knowledge-exchange and capacity-building opportunities for stakeholders engaged in Hep C prevention, treatment and care across Canada. Our 15 rapporteurs learned about current research and worked together to summarize that information and bring it back to their communities.

In part one of this two-part blog series, two rapporteurs reflect on their experiences at the LI.