Catégorie : Nouvelles

The Face of Our Story

By Signe Dewar and Tom Barnard

signe-photo-cropped tom-photo-croppedThe Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art, in partnership with the Toronto Community Hep C Program (TCHCP), invited people with lived experience of hepatitis C to take part in an art project called The Face of Our Story.  In that project, clay tiles depicting stories of lived experience would be displayed at the museum on World Hepatitis Day, July 28, 2016. This is the story of Signe and Tom who participated in the event.

The day arrived when we met with museum staff, were given a tour, and the project was explained to us. We were nervous.  We were proud to be part of this experience, but at the same time unsure of our surroundings and what was expected of us. None of us had ever put on an art show in a museum. We spoke in hushed tones and experienced a feeling of reverence as we saw the beautiful work of other artists. We exchanged glances and thought, “Uh oh! What are we doing here?”

More obvious and sinister villains are responsible for the number of drug overdose deaths in Vancouver Island

By Shane Calder

shane-speaking-at-rally-croppedBritish Columbia, Vancouver Island in particular, is in the midst of health tragedy that many of us find hard to describe. In one sense, we can trace the beginning of this crisis to Thursday, April 14th, 2016 when the chief medical office, flanked by the B.C. Minister of Health, declared a public health emergency to address what had already been four terrible months of overdose-related deaths. Since then, I have been privy to receiving periodic updates from the B.C. Coroner Service on the ever-climbing death toll—the most recent post released mid-September.

On a personal note, this ever-escalating human tragedy started for me on December 21st, 2015, three weeks after the Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria had stolen from their premises what has since been described as the largest theft of fentanyl in the history of the Vancouver Island Health Authority. On that afternoon of December 21st, the body of a much-liked client was discovered in a parkade less than a block from the region’s largest needle exchange. He died of an overdose.

We need to address the unique and complex issues of Indigenous people living with HIV

By Cécile Kazatchkine and Sandra Ka Hon Chu

cecile-k-2SANDRA_HI_RES- croppedIndigenous people in Canada are disproportionately affected by HIV, representing 10.8 per cent of new HIV infections and 9.1 per cent of people living with HIV in Canada.[1]  In Saskatchewan alone, the number of Indigenous people living with HIV is around twice the national average and the highest in Canada and “one of the few places in the industrialized world where people are still dying from AIDS and HIV.”

Lack of access to HIV treatment and care among other complex factors contributes to these alarming rates: in many rural or remote areas, HIV-specific services are simply not available, or the small size of the community creates concerns around confidentiality for those accessing care. Indigenous people in Canada — many of whom are surviving a legacy of colonization and the intergenerational effects of residential schools — continue to experience systemic discrimination and extremely high rates of incarceration. In this context, the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure may be perceived as yet another form of institutionalized violence and discrimination, amplifying the negative impact of the HIV epidemic on Indigenous communities.

La Déclaration de consensus canadien. Appuyez-la. Utilisez-la. C’est ce que j’ai fait et voici pourquoi.

Glenn BetteridgePar Glenn Betteridge

Plusieurs d’entre vous ont possiblement observé les fluctuations qui se produisent dans le mouvement communautaire, au gré des percées médicales et scientifiques, des priorités, du militantisme communautaire ainsi que des forces plus globales d’ordre politique, social et économique. Depuis plus de vingt ans que je travaille dans le milieu communautaire et y fais du bénévolat, je cherche à m’ancrer dans quelques fondements bien solides, pour donner une base stable à mon travail. Le lien essentiel entre la santé et les droits humains. La nécessité de fonder les politiques, programmes et services sur les données probantes et l’expérience vécue. De même que l’engagement à la justice sociale et une attention sérieuse aux voix des personnes les plus touchées. C’est pourquoi j’ai signé et appuyé la Déclaration de consensus canadien sur les bienfaits de santé et de prévention associés au dépistage du VIH et aux médicaments antirétroviraux contre le VIH. La Déclaration de consensus mise sur ces mêmes fondements afin de jeter les bases d’une réponse à l’épidémie du VIH qui soit exhaustive, holistique et dirigée par la communauté alliant le traitement et la prévention du VIH ainsi que la santé et les droits de la personne.

How intimate partner violence affects women living with HIV

By Sandra Ka Hon Chu

SANDRA_HI_RES- croppedA global study released last year revealed alarming figures concerning women living with HIV and violence. Among 945 women living with HIV from 94 countries who participated in the study, 89 per cent reported having experienced or feared violence before, since and/or because of their HIV diagnosis. Violence they experienced was reported to be higher after HIV diagnosis from their intimate partner and others in their social network. [1]The troubling nexus between HIV and gender-based violence spurred the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, HIV & AIDS Legal Clinic Ontario and METRAC to produce a legal information guide for women living with HIV who are facing — or at risk of — “intimate partner violence” — that is, physical, sexual or psychological harm from a current or former partner or spouse.

In addition to being an exceedingly common experience among women living with HIV, intimate partner violence and HIV are both stigmatized, isolating people who are affected. Intimate partner violence also increases women’s vulnerability to HIV. Women who have violent partners are more likely to have forced sex, are less likely to negotiate condom use, and are more likely to be abused when they insist on condom use— which poses greater risks of HIV transmission.