Catégorie : Articles

There are thousands of people in Canada who are in a serodiscordant relationship, yet we know very little about their experiences and needs

By James Iveniuk

Marcus and David have been dating for three years. Marcus is HIV-positive and David is HIV-negative. David was worried when he told his parents that his new partner was HIV-positive, but after they saw how happy Marcus makes him, they have welcomed Marcus into their lives. At the same time, they still worry that their son may become infected.

Faith is living with HIV, and her partner, Scott, is HIV-negative. Faith often finds herself having to educate Scott on what she has to do to manage her condition and Scott has had difficulty understanding because information changes quickly. They fight more often — about sex, about health —and about where they see their relationship going.

These are hypothetical examples of two different types of relationships that involve HIV, yet many other couples have their own, unique experiences. So it is hard to know what kinds of experiences are the most common for people in these relationships.

Indétectable = Intransmissible – CATIE y adhère

Par Laurie Edmiston

Nous tous, ici, chez CATIE, et par le fait même les gens de partout au monde, célèbrent l’avancée la plus importante dans le monde du VIH depuis l’avènement du traitement combiné efficace il y a 20 ans : les personnes vivant avec le VIH et ayant une charge virale indétectable durable peuvent déclarer avec confiance à leurs partenaires sexuels qu’elles ne sont pas contagieuses! Le caractère « fabuleux » de cette annonce ne peut être sous-estimé. Avec ou sans condom, si vous êtes indétectable, vous ne transmettrez pas le VIH! Cette avancée change toute la donne et les personnes vivant avec le VIH peuvent fièrement partager cette information. Parallèlement, les fournisseurs de services travaillant dans le domaine du VIH doivent rapidement se mettre au niveau et partager largement cette info dans leurs communautés. CATIE élaborera davantage de ressources pour aider à partager cette nouvelle extraordinaire, alors restez à l’écoute! Entretemps, consultez les ressources sur la prévention à catie.ca et ajoutez le nom de votre organisme à la Déclaration de consensus de la campagne pour l’accès à la prévention. Passons le mot! Faites-vous tester, suivez un traitement, devenez indétectable et profitez de vos relations sexuelles!

 

Laurie Edmiston est directrice générale de CATIE, la source canadienne de renseignements sur le VIH et l’hépatite C.

The Face of Our Story

By Signe Dewar and Tom Barnard

signe-photo-cropped tom-photo-croppedThe Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art, in partnership with the Toronto Community Hep C Program (TCHCP), invited people with lived experience of hepatitis C to take part in an art project called The Face of Our Story.  In that project, clay tiles depicting stories of lived experience would be displayed at the museum on World Hepatitis Day, July 28, 2016. This is the story of Signe and Tom who participated in the event.

The day arrived when we met with museum staff, were given a tour, and the project was explained to us. We were nervous.  We were proud to be part of this experience, but at the same time unsure of our surroundings and what was expected of us. None of us had ever put on an art show in a museum. We spoke in hushed tones and experienced a feeling of reverence as we saw the beautiful work of other artists. We exchanged glances and thought, “Uh oh! What are we doing here?”

More obvious and sinister villains are responsible for the number of drug overdose deaths in Vancouver Island

By Shane Calder

shane-speaking-at-rally-croppedBritish Columbia, Vancouver Island in particular, is in the midst of health tragedy that many of us find hard to describe. In one sense, we can trace the beginning of this crisis to Thursday, April 14th, 2016 when the chief medical office, flanked by the B.C. Minister of Health, declared a public health emergency to address what had already been four terrible months of overdose-related deaths. Since then, I have been privy to receiving periodic updates from the B.C. Coroner Service on the ever-climbing death toll—the most recent post released mid-September.

On a personal note, this ever-escalating human tragedy started for me on December 21st, 2015, three weeks after the Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria had stolen from their premises what has since been described as the largest theft of fentanyl in the history of the Vancouver Island Health Authority. On that afternoon of December 21st, the body of a much-liked client was discovered in a parkade less than a block from the region’s largest needle exchange. He died of an overdose.

From CWGHR to realize: A Coming of Age Story

By Tamtcy-pic-croppedmy C. Yates

“So what organization do you represent?”

“CWGHR,” I responded to my new friend at the 2016 International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa.  I pronounce our acronym like, “Quigger.”

“Quitter?”

“No, CWGHR.”

“Oh, I’ve never heard of Quitter.”

“… that’s because the name is actually, CWGHR”.

Picture it … Quebec City, 1998, thirty people with diverse interests, identities and professions meet to discuss the idea of HIV and rehabilitation for the first time. All were curious, but unsure of the connection between rehabilitation and HIV prevention, treatment, care and support and the role they could play. There the Canadian Working Group on HIV and Rehabilitation (CWGHR) was born! As people were no longer expecting to die of AIDS, this group of pioneers could see that rehabilitation – in a broad sense – was key to enabling people living with HIV to not only survive, but also thrive.

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